Not Especially Fond of “The Shack”?

The Shack Cons

Three weeks ago, I published the first post in a series of Wednesday posts titled “Not Especially Fond of ‘The Shack’? The Shack Facts.” In it, I shared facts about The Shack book and its author, William P. Young, for those who knew little or nothing about either. In last Wednesday’s post, I shared what I believed to be the pros of reading/watching The Shack. In today’s (lengthier than usual) post, I will be sharing parts from book and the movie (the movie held true to the message of the book) that raised major red flags of concern in my mind regarding Young’s beliefs about salvation.

I would like to remind you that I am not a scholar or a theologian, but I enjoy researching and then passing on what I’ve learned (spoiler alert). Because The Shack book is a publishing phenomenon and runaway New York Times bestseller that has affected gobs of people (including myself), I believe we should be informed concerning its messages, both biblical and non-biblical.

If you are riding the fence on whether or not to read/see The Shack, I pray that the information provided in my 3-week Wednesday post series will help you make an informed decision, at the very least. At the most, I pray it will encourage you to do your own research. I will warn you, though: it’s easy to get overwhelmed in the sea of information the Internet freely provides.

In 2007, when The Shack book was first released, many Bible-believing Christians were concerned about some of the statements Young makes through the dialogue between Papa, Jesus, Sarayu, and Mack Phillips. “It is a work of fiction,” was a frequent response made in an effort to downplay some of those objections. But–and this is a very important but–no one can deny that most authors write in order to communicate what they most deeply believe. I do. This summer, my first book, His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love, will be published. When people ask me what it’s about, I tell them, “It’s basically my heart in a book.”

The following are some of the messages expressed in the novel that set off warning signals in my mind:

  • Page 100, where Papa is talking to Mack: “Humans … are created in my image.” Genesis 1:26-27 says that Adam and Eve were created in God’s image, but after the fall, Genesis 5:1-3 says that Adam “became the father of a son in his (Adam’s) own likeness.” The fall changed everything. The perfect union between God and man was breached when Adam and Eve disobeyed Father God–asserting their independence, rather than remaining perfectly dependent on Him. There are places strewn throughout the book where Papa refers to all of humanity as being her children. (Father God is portrayed as an African American woman through most of the book and movie.) This completely disagrees with Scripture. Only those who are born again (who have believed in Jesus) are referred to as “children of God” (John 1:12, 11:52; Acts 17:29;  Rom. 8:16, 21; 9:8; Phil. 2:15; 1 John 3:1-2, 10; 5:2) in the Bible.
  • Page 103, where Mack is talking to Papa after he noticed the nail scars on her wrists: “I’m so sorry that you, that Jesus, had to die.” God the Father did not die on the cross (God is Spirit, John 4:24). God the Son, who came in human flesh, is the only Person of the Trinity who suffered the horrific cruelty of the cross in His physical body (Matt. 27:46; Mark 15:36).
  • Page 182, where Jesus is talking to Mack: “Those who love me come from every system that exists. They were Buddhists or Mormons, Baptists or Muslim, Democrats, Republicans, and many who don’t vote or are not part of any Sunday morning or religious institutions. I have followers who were murderers and many who were self-righteous. Some are bankers and bookies, Americans and Iraqis, Jews and Palestinians. I have no desire to make them Christian …” Acts 11:26, Acts 26:28, and 1 Peter 4:16 all refer to those who have believed in Jesus as Christians. I would also like to point out that those in the Bible who are not believers in Christ are referred to as sinners, not saints, and are defined by their sin (murderers, self-righteous). Believers in Christ, however, are referred to as saints and are not defined by their behavior, but by who they eternally are in Him (Rev. 20:12, 15; 21:27).
  • Page 192, where Papa and Mack are talking: Papa: “Honey, you asked me what Jesus accomplished on the cross; so now listen to me carefully: through his death and resurrection, I am now fully reconciled to the world.” Mack: “The whole world? You mean those who believe in you, right?” Papa: “The whole world, Mack. All I am telling you is that reconciliation is a two way street, and I have done my part, totally, completely, finally. It is not the nature of love to force a relationship but it is the nature of love to open the way.” I must admit that there were statements like this one that left me scratching my head, wondering what Young really believed about salvation. What he is saying about God having done His part in reconciling the world to Himself is true (Jesus Christ died on the cross), but a response of faith on the part of each person is required (which Young does not make clear) in order for them to be forgiven, saved, partakers in Christ’s eternal life (in Christ), children of Father God, righteous, and free from condemnation, judgment, and punishment (John 5:24; Acts 10:43, 26:17-18; Rom. 1:16-17; 3:26; 4:13-14, 22-24; 6:3-4, 17-22; 8:5-8, 9-10, 12-14; 10:4, 9-10, 17-23; 12:19; 16:7; 1 Cor. 3:17; 5:9-13; 6:9-11; 2 Cor. 2:15-17; 4:3-4; 5:18-20; 6:14-17; 11:13-15; 13:5; Gal. 1:8-9; 2:4-5; 3:22; 5:4-5, 19-21; Eph. 1:13-14; 2:1-3, 12; 4:17-20; 5:5; Phil. 2:14; Col. 1:21-23; 2:13-14; 3:5-10; 4:5-6; 1 Thess. 1:9-10; 2:15-16; 5:2-9; 2 Thess. 1:6-10; 2:12; 3:1-2; 1 Tim. 1:8-11; 2 Tim. 3:1-8; Tit. 1:15-16; Heb. 2:2-3; 10:26-29; 12:25; 2 Pet. 2:4-10, 17; 1 John 2:22-23; 3:10, 14-15; 4:5-6; 5:1; Rev. 20:12-15).

I’m happy to say that I am no longer scratching my head about what Young really believes. After spending quite some time researching the Internet, reading several different articles, listening to many YouTube videos of Young speaking, and watching the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) series, Restoring the Shack, there is no doubt in my mind that Young adheres to Christian Universalism. According to Wikipedia, Christian Universalism is a school of Christian theology which includes the belief in the doctrine of universal reconciliation, the view that all human beings will ultimately be restored to a right relationship with God in Heaven and the New Jerusalem.

To date, TBN has aired fourteen episodes of Restoring the Shack, and with each episode, Young reveals more about his adherence to Christian Universalism. I am not only surprised, but I am also disappointed that TBN is promoting Young’s theology. It makes me wonder if they really understand where Young is coming from.
 The following is an excerpt from an article titled, “The Shack and Universal Reconciliation,” on Young’s own website that should leave no doubt in anyone’s mind about what the author believes:

Paul Young told me he is a “hopeful universalist.” He believes that our loving God sent His Son to die for every single sinner without exception. One day God will effectually reconcile every sinner to Himself. Paul uses the term “hopeful” universalism because he understands that the Scriptures speak of judgment, but Paul is “hopeful” that even in judgment, the love of God will eventually bring the sinner being judged to love for Jesus Christ. Paul Young is “hopeful” that the fire of God’s love will eventually and effectually persuade every sinner of God’s love in Christ.

In his March 9, 2017, post, Christian author, blogger, and book reviewer, Tim Challies, recently reviewed Young’s newest work, “What Does The Shack Really Teach? Lies We Believe About God Tells Us.” In much of his post, Challies quotes directly from Young’s latest book. The following part of his post, I believe, is the most important revelation concerning the lie of universal reconciliation that Young promotes:

(Lie #13) Chapter 13: “You need to get saved.” Here he (Young) turns to the matter of salvation. I (Challies) will excerpt this at length so you can see his full-out embrace of universalism—that everybody has been or will be saved by God.

So what is the Good News? What is the Gospel?

The Good News is not that Jesus has opened up the possibility of salvation and you have been invited to receive Jesus into your life. The Gospel is that Jesus has already included you into His life, into His relationship with God the Father, and into His anointing in the Holy Spirit. The Good News is that Jesus did this without your vote, and whether you believe it or not won’t make it any less or more true.

What or who saves me? Either God did in Jesus, or I save myself. If, in any way, I participate in the completed act of salvation accomplished in Jesus, then my part is what actually saves me. Saving faith is not our faith, but the faith of Jesus.

God does not wait for my choice and then “save me.” God has acted decisively and universally for all humankind. Now our daily choice is to either grow and participate in that reality or continue to live in the blindness of our own independence.

Are you suggesting that everyone is saved? That you believe in universal salvation?

That is exactly what I am saying!

Here’s the truth: every person who has ever been conceived was included in the death, burial, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus. When Jesus was lifted up, God “dragged” all human beings to Himself (John 12:32). Jesus is the Savior of all humankind, especially believers (1 Timothy 4:10). Further, every single human being is in Christ (John 1:3), and Christ is in them, and Christ is in the Father (John 14:20). When Christ—the Creator in whom the cosmos was created—died, we all died. When Christ rose, we rose (2 Corinthians 5).

Young leaves no doubt that he espouses universalism. To further his argument, he includes an appendix on the matter.

 

Clearly, no one has to wonder at all about Young’s theology anymore. To be completely honest, I was so disappointed to find this out! As I mentioned in my post, The Shack Pros, much of this book/movie touched places in my heart as nothing else ever has.

In closing this series of Wednesday posts, I will give my overall opinion of The Shack. For biblically-grounded believers in Christ who have a desire to learn more about The Shack, I would encourage them to eat the meat of sound, biblical theology and throw away the bones of unbiblical ideology. Test every question you have against what the Bible actually says on the matter (Acts 17:11). The Shack’s personification of the Trinity’s compassionate and endearing love, grace, and mercy (among themselves and toward Mack) is sure to foster receptivity in the souls of believers in Christ to enjoy the gifts already lavished on them through their eternal spiritual union with Him.

For those who know little or nothing about sound, biblical theology (either unbelievers in Christ or believers in Christ with unrenewed minds), I would strongly caution you not to buy into Young’s theology of Universal Reconciliation, his “hopeful” belief that all humankind will eventually be reconciled to God through no choice of their own. It’s just not biblical (find out for yourself by reading the Scriptures listed in the fourth bullet point above). My heartfelt prayer is that no one would be sucked into the lie that a relationship with God is a done deal–whether we want it or not. A forced love relationship is an oxymoron.

For more information about The Shack movie, you can go to Focus on the Family’s Plugged In Movie Reviews.com.

For a more in-depth article concerning the theology of The Shack, please read Randy Alcorn’s “Reflections on The Shack.”

I would love to interact with you concerning the entire “Not Especially Fond of The Shack?” series of Wednesday posts.

  1. Had you read/watched The Shack book/movie prior to reading this series of Wednesday posts?
  2. If yes, has the information provided in these posts changed how you view the messages communicated in The Shack? If yes, please explain.
  3. If you answered no to question 1, will you read/watch The Shack book/movie now? Why or why not?

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

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“God Won’t Give Us More Than We Can Handle.” True or False?

His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love - Excerpt 13

If you’ve lived on planet earth long enough, you’ve probably heard at least one Christian say to another Christian, “God won’t give us more than we can handle” in a well-meaning, heart-felt attempt to encourage them. Or maybe someone has said it to you when you were going through a really tough time. I remember people saying it to me when my world was being rocked to the core and thinking, It sure feels like more than I can handle! Can you relate?

The truth is … that statement is nowhere to be found in Scripture. The Lord will allow circumstances in our lives that are more than we can handle, so that we will learn to stop relying on our natural strength and trust in His strength instead. Sadly, most of us will not learn this, apart from going through circumstances where our natural resources are utterly exhausted. I didn’t. Christ taught me the powerful principle of learning to trust Him as my life during one of the most painful seasons I’ve ever experienced.

In the summer of 2002, I was at the altar during an evening church service, asking the Lord how He wanted to use my life for His glory. He showed me (by flashing a picture through my mind) that someday I would be teaching His Word instead of high school math.

I’m not saying that the Lord didn’t use me for His glory while I was teaching high school math because I believe He did. He was just showing me that He was about to change the vocation through which He would reveal His glory through me. But first (and unbeknownst to me), He needed to do a major “mental overhaul” in the way I viewed the Christian life.

Not long after the Lord gave me that picture, I was lying on my face on our bedroom floor, asking Him when I was going to get to stop teaching math and start teaching His Word. After a while, I heard Him speak (in the form of a thought going through my mind).

But those who wait on the Lord
Shall renew their strength;
They shall mount up with wings like eagles,
They shall run and not be weary,
They shall walk and not faint” (Isa. 40:31 NKJV).

Out of this entire Scripture, the only word I really heard was wait, and the impatient flesh pattern in my brain instantly rose up in rebuke. I was disappointed that I wasn’t going to start teaching His Word right away.

That summer, I had been taking good care of myself, working out, and eating right. When school started in the fall, I remember telling a good friend of mine that I had never felt stronger in my life after she commented on how well I looked. While there is nothing wrong with good nutrition and exercise habits, I took it to an extreme and became proud without realizing it. My focus was on me, and what I was doing to make myself healthy and strong. My physical strength was my chariot—what I was trusting in, rather than Christ (Psalm 20:7).

In the months that followed, I began having problems with my colon. I had never had colon issues before and began to worry that something was seriously wrong. A word of advice if you are having health issues: don’t try to diagnose yourself through the Internet. Because of what I read, fear compounded my colon issues.

A word of advice if you are having health issues: don’t try to diagnose yourself through the Internet.

I made an appointment with a gastroenterologist and had a colonoscopy. It revealed that I had irritable bowel syndrome, which could be controlled with diet and stress reduction. Nothing too serious. I was so relieved that I didn’t have cancer.

One morning not long after that, I swallowed a handful of vitamins and aspirin with some orange juice. It felt like one of the vitamins had permanently lodged in my esophagus. In the days that followed, I experienced a chronic sore throat. (This is a severe hiccup for someone who teaches school.) By the end of every workday, I was so exhausted all I wanted to do was go to bed.

I went to a couple of different specialists, one of whom diagnosed me with acid reflux and put me on medicine to treat those symptoms. The medicine didn’t help at all because I didn’t have acid reflux. I still had a chronic sore throat, though—along with the irritable bowel syndrome.

After suffering through almost two years of this—going from doctor to doctor, praying healing Scriptures, and believing God, I threw up my hands and told the Lord, “I have done everything I know to do, and nothing is working. If anything good is going to come out of this, You are going to have to do it. I quit.”

One month later, I went through three weeks of testing at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. I was diagnosed with esophageal nerve damage and prescribed a low-dose medication to help relieve the chronic pain. Today, I’m happy to report that after almost ten years of being on that medication, the chronic sore throat is gone, and I no longer have to take it.

While I am very grateful that the Lord healed me, I am more thankful that He did not do it right away. Yes, that’s right. He taught me so much through that painful two-year process. Up until that time, I had begun to understand that Christ lived in me, but I viewed Him as a “helper” when I got stuck in a hard place that I couldn’t get out of on my own. In other words, His power remained dormant in me until I needed it.

All of my efforts had to be completely exhausted before I finally understood that He didn’t want to just “help me” live my life—He wanted me to realize that He was my Life, and apart from trusting dependence on Him, I could do nothing of eternal value (John 15:5). Looking back at the moment when I gave up, I believe He must have grinned a mile wide and said, “Good! Now I can do something.”

Remember that great “wait” Scripture the Lord gave me from Isaiah? After understanding my spiritual union with Him, He took me back to it, this time in a different translation:

“Yet those who wait for the Lord
Will gain new strength;
They will mount up with wings like eagles,
They will run and not get tired,
They will walk and not become weary” (Isa. 40:31 NASB).

The first two lines of the previous translation said,

“But those who wait on the Lord
Shall renew their strength” (Isa. 40:31 NKJV).

Immediately, the words new strength from the New American Standard Bible jumped off the page and into my heart! What a kiss! His strength was the new strength!

What’s even more fascinating is that the Hebrew word for wait actually means “to bind together.” When we recognize that our spirit and Christ’s Spirit are eternally bound together, we will begin to understand that we have no life apart from Him. And get this: the word gain signifies “a substitution or interchange—an exchange of His supernatural strength for our natural strength.” In light of my new understanding, the following is my personal paraphrase of the first part of this verse:

Those who understand and acknowledge their spiritual union with the Lord
will exchange their natural strength for His supernatural strength
by trusting Him to live His life through them.

When we stop relying on our natural strength and begin trusting Him to live through us, we can’t go wrong! But just like everything else in His kingdom, we must do this by faith.

Dear reader, I hope you enjoyed today’s excerpt from my soon-to-be-published Bible study, His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love. I would love to interact with you concerning its content by asking you a few of questions:

  1. Prior to reading today’s post, did you believe the statement, “God won’t give us more than we can handle?”
  2. Do you still believe it? Why or why not?
  3. How will what you’ve learned in today’s post change the way you handle trials that come into your life?

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

Home     My Core Beliefs     About     Resources     Speaking     Contact

Not Especially Fond of “The Shack”?

The Shack Pros

Last Wednesday, I posted the first in a series of three Wednesday posts titled “Not Especially Fond of The Shack? The Shack Facts.” For those who know little or nothing about this runaway New York Times bestselling book, I shared some facts about its history, story line, and author, William P. Young.

In today’s post, I share what I believe to be the positive aspects (pros) of the messages communicated in both The Shack book and The Shack movie (spoiler alert).

To read or not to read The Shack book? To watch or not to watch The Shack movie? These are the questions that are going through the minds of many evangelical Christians right now. I took a Facebook poll on my personal page (not my author page) on Monday, May 15, 2017, asking the question,

I’m wondering how many of you have read and/or watched The Shack and, if you have, what your take away was from either or both?

I wasn’t surprised to get quite a bit of engagement, with a variety of responses. They ranged from, “Haven’t read the book or watched the movie,” to “I couldn’t get through the book, and I won’t watch the movie,” to “Loved the book and the movie!” There were as many unique responses as there were responders. Not surprising either. Every person on planet earth has a different way of looking at things, influenced by their own genetic disposition (nature), their life experiences (nurture), and their spiritual (or nonspiritual) views.

I appreciated (and am still gleaning from) all the honest input. There were those who recommended the book, Finding God in Shack (there are actually two books on Amazon.com by the same name, but two different authors), as well as the Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN) series, Restoring the Shack, to learn more.

It’s not unusual to hear a movie goer who has read a book from which a movie is based say, “The book was so much better than the movie!” I believe one of the reasons for this is because of the time limitations placed on its big-screen adaptation. In my opinion, The Shack movie remained, for the most part, true to The Shack book. There were a few minor discrepancies that I noticed, but nothing major worth pointing out.

A novel is as good as its ability to imprint impacting images in the minds of its readers. I first read The Shack in 2007 at the recommendation of a good friend. Anyone who knows me well at all, knows that I don’t just “read” a book; I become intimately acquainted with it. It just doesn’t feel natural to me to read a book without a pen in hand. I’m always ready to put asterisks, smiley faces, hmmm … , wow!, I agree! and so on in the margins beside the content I especially enjoy. On the other hand, I put sad faces, what?! I don’t agree! or Are you kidding me?! in the margins beside concepts I can’t (or won’t) accept.

In addition to reviewing the notes in the margins of my book, I enjoyed rereading my hand-written “review” (from 2007) on the first blank page at the end of it:

I believe the reason this book has had such an overwhelming impact on so many hearts is that it engages the imagination—the movie theater in our minds–with a more genuine picture of the authentic, affectionate love that Father God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit have for humanity than has ever been portrayed before. This book provides a wonderful picture of grace and will be a very special addition to my already growing library on the subject.

Ten years later, as I sat in the movie theater watching this anomaly come to life, I was mesmerized (and wishing I would have packed my purse with Kleenex!). And, of course, it made me want to reread the book the first chance I got. Which I did. But this time with different images.

There is a line in the foreword of the book that encapsulates the reason, I believe, so many are drawn to The Shack (it resounded with me!):

I suppose that since most of our hurts come through relationships, so will our healing. And I know that grace rarely makes sense for those looking in from the outside.

This morning, I woke up to the captivating theme song of the movie, “Keep Your Eyes on Me,” a duet written and recorded by Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, playing in my mind. Go ahead and take a listen for yourself if you would like:

The words to this song convey a very simple biblical message:

When the hurts of this life seem much more real than your faith and hope in God, keep your eyes on Him.

Right after Steven and I got married in July 1997, one of the Scriptures that God kept bringing to the forefront of my mind was Hebrews 12:1-2 (I even had a coffee mug with the passage on it), which says,

We are surrounded by a great cloud of people whose lives tell us what faith means. So let us run the race that is before us and never give up. We should remove from our lives anything that would get in the way and the sin that so easily holds us back. Let us look only to Jesus, the One who began our faith and who makes it perfect. He suffered death on the cross. But he accepted the shame as if it were nothing because of the joy that God put before him. And now he is sitting at the right side of God’s throne. (NCV)

God used this passage in Hebrews along with several others to remind me of the importance of keeping my focus on Him (Isa. 26:3; Col. 3:1-4; Phil. 4:8). During that time in my life, I was experiencing great sadness. My only child told me he wanted to go live with his dad. He had lived with me for the first five years following the divorce. Although I was shocked and devastated when he shared the news, I understood his need to be with his dad. (A twelve-year-old should never have to choose between his parents.)

In addition to The Shack’s message on the importance of keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus when our personal world is being rocked to the core, I found the following to be positive takeaway:

  • God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit are portrayed as a warm, compassionate, joy-filled Trio of Perfect Love who long for an up-close-and-personal relationship with every person on the face of this earth (John 3;  Rom. 1:161 Tim. 2:4; 2 Pet. 3:9).

If you have read/watched The Shack, you already know that I included its endearing catchphrase in the title of this series of Wednesday posts. The line is Papa’s (Father God’s) and He (well, she) says to the protagonist, Mack Phillips,

I’m especially fond of Missy, and you, too.

Then, at some time later, Mack says to Papa,

Is there anyone you aren’t especially fond of?

To which she replies,

Nope. Haven’t been able to find any.

This line of dialogue reminds me of John 3:16, which says,

God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life.

John 3:16 is likely the most well-known Scripture in the New Testament. It embodies the gospel, the good news of Jesus Christ. I wrote an entire post over the importance of this single verse. The gospel clearly requires a response from each person, whether to believe in (into) Jesus and experience eternal life or not to believe–remain outside the life of Christ–and perish. It’s that simple.

In next Wednesday’s post, The Shack Cons, I will be sharing what I’ve learned about Young’s personal beliefs about salvation. And I will tell you, he and I are definitely not on the same page concerning the most important aspect of life—and death—and eternity.

Another positive takeaway I got from the message in The Shack was:

I loved the representation of Father God’s consoling empathy (tears) toward Mack in the suffering he endured throughout his life—from his childhood abuse to the gut-wrenching tragedy of losing his youngest daughter to a sadistic serial killer–and the great lengths He went to in order to bring healing and restoration to his life. Two quotes really stood out to me, words that I believe reflect Father God’s compassion for us in our deepest wounding:

Pain has a way of clipping our wings and keeping us from being able to fly (He longs for us to experience a fulfilling life on this earth).

Just because I work incredible good out of unspeakable tragedies doesn’t mean I orchestrate the tragedies. Don’t ever assume that my using something means I caused it or that I need it to accomplish my purposes. That will only lead you to false notions about me. Grace doesn’t depend on suffering to exist, but where there is suffering you will find grace in many facets and colors (He is not the Author of tragedies, but can bring incredible healing in the midst of them).

Although there were many aspects of The Shack that warmed my heart, I’m going to wrap up my discussion of the positive takeaways with this one:

  • God knows every sin, every failure, every dark thought and emotion we’ve ever experienced, and yet He still pursues a personal love relationship with us–even when we could care less about Him (Luke 15).

Mack was blinded by his intense anger and hatred toward Missy’s killer. And by his anger toward God for allowing these horrible events to touch his life. Yet God loved him so much, he longed for and pursued an intimate relationship with Mack. God understands our extreme lack of understanding (because He’s omniscient) and wants to help us learn to trust Him with every facet of our lives, regardless of whether or not we understand everything. In short, trust always requires unanswered questions.

When I think about all the years that I could have cared less about what God thought or wanted for my life—the years that I spent trying to milk my love, value, and acceptance from this world, I am in awe of the amazing grace, love, and patience that He exercised toward me. He pursued me and waited for me to want an intimate relationship with Him as much as He wanted an intimate relationship with me.

My two greatest personal takeaways from the book and the movie? I closed The Shack book longing for more intimate interaction with my Beloved, and I walked out of the movie theater filled with an abiding sense of joy. Both the book and movie reminded me that my Beloved is especially fond of me, Kimberly Kay Francis, who lives at the top of the Texas Panhandle in the United States of America. He knows my name and my address and chooses to live where I live–right in the center of my new heart in Him!

In today’s post, I shared what I believe to be the pros–the positive takeaways–from reading The Shack book and watching The Shack movie. While I savored the book (twice) and the movie (twice), there were places in both that raised very important red flags of concern in my mind about the author’s personal beliefs, especially about salvation. I’m looking forward to sharing my concerns and the answers I found through my research with you in next Wednesday’s post.

In the meantime, I would love to interact with you concerning today’s post content.

  1. Have you read The Shack book and/or seen The Shack movie?
  2. If yes, what was your take away from either or both?
  3. If no, would you like to see the movie and/or read the book? If not, why not?

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

Home     My Core Beliefs     About     Resources     Speaking     Contact

 

 

 

The Difference between Guilt and Shame

His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love - Excerpt 12

Living in a world inundated with judgment, frustration, anger, unforgiveness, bitterness, resentment, and performance-based acceptance can be painful and wearisome. In Song 1:7, the Shulammite is desperately seeking her great Shepherd’s direction in order to find much-needed nourishment and rest.

Today, we are going to look at two more prevalent fleshly traps as we unpack the maiden’s last question to the One whom her soul loves.

“Tell me, O you whom my soul loves,
Where do you pasture your flock,
Where do you make it lie down at noon?
For why should I be like one who veils herself
Beside the flocks of your companions?”
                                                                      —Song 1:7

 For why should I be like one who veils herself

In the first half of this rhetorical question, the Shulammite is saying, “Does what I’ve done wrong merit hiding behind a veil of guilt and shame for the rest of my life?” A common human response to wrongdoing is to feel guilt and shame and to want to go into hiding. When Adam and Eve disobeyed God in the garden of Eden, their eyes were opened to what they had done wrong. They saw their own nakedness (their separation from God’s presence) and immediately covered themselves with fig leaves. For the first time in their lives, they felt the piercing pain of sin’s consequences, specifically guilt and shame (see Genesis 3).

Guilt and shame are so closely related it can be difficult to distinguish between the two. While guilt says, “I feel bad about what I’ve done wrong,” shame goes a step further, saying, “Because I’ve done wrong, I must be a bad person.” Both the guilt and the shame that Adam and Eve experienced when they disobeyed God were valid because their wrongdoing resulted in their separation from Him. Before they sinned, Adam and Eve were in perfect union with God’s life—they were “right with God” because they were joined to Him. When they sinned, they were immediately separated from His life and experienced spiritual death.

Every unbeliever has valid reasons to experience both guilt and shame. Yet for Christ’s bride, there is no biblical basis to experience either in the realm of spiritual accounting. Let’s look at what God says about casting a guilty verdict on a believer in Christ.

The biblical definition for guilt is “to owe a debt.” After absorbing the sin of the world and before taking His last breath, Jesus cried out, “It is finished!” (John 19:30). Finished means “to bring to a close, to end, to pay.” The moment we believed in (into) Jesus for salvation, we cashed in on His entire payment for our personal sin debt. As a result, we are declared “not guilty” in the eternal spiritual realm. And as for shame, our wrongdoing can never change our forever state of right-being (2 Corinthians 5:21). Believers in Christ are right with God for all time and eternity because of Jesus’ finished work (John 10:28, 2 Tim. 2:13; Heb. 13:5).

Please don’t misinterpret my words as my taking a light view on sin. Christ suffered unspeakable torture on our behalf because of sin. Sin is ugly and can cause massive collateral damage. It is also important to point out that even though Christ has obliterated our guilt as far as the eternal spiritual realm goes, it does not mean we are shielded from the earthly convictions of “guilty” when we wound another person or break the law of the land. Depending on the severity of the sin, we may even have to pay our debt to society by spending time in prison.

Dear reader, I hope you enjoyed today’s excerpt from my soon-to-be-published Bible study, His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love. I would love to interact with you concerning its content by asking you a few of questions:

  1. Prior to reading today’s post, did you understand the difference between guilt and shame?
  2. Do you struggle with feelings of guilt and shame?
  3. How will what you’ve learned in today’s post change the way you deal with feelings of guilt and shame in the future?

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

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Not Especially Fond of “The Shack”?

The Shack Facts

If you have never heard of The Shack book or The Shack movie, you might be living in a cave–or a shack (tongue in cheek). The book stirred up quite a controversy in Christian circles back in 2007 when it was first released. And now, ten years later, it’s been adapted for the big screen. It premiered in March and, not surprisingly, is still causing quite a theological stir.

I first read the book in 2007, watched the movie in March 2017, and just finished reading the book for the second time. I am not a theologian and certainly wouldn’t deem myself a scholar in anything. But I do enjoy researching and learning–and then passing on what I’ve learned.

When I taught high school math, I tried to approach every lesson from the point of view of my students, to put myself in their seat, and to not assume anything (wouldn’t it be great if all of our assumers were broken?). So, my purpose in today’s post is to share the facts about The Shack book and its author for those who know nothing or very little about either (spoiler alert). In next Wednesday’s post, I will share what I believe are the pros of the message communicated in the book and the movie. And then, in the following Wednesday’s post, I will wrap up my discussion with what I believe are the cons.

The book’s 62-year-old author, William P. Young, was born in Canada and was the oldest of four children. His parents became missionaries through the CMA (Christian and Missionary Alliance) in the New Guinea Highlands when Young was only a year old. Young describes his relationship with his dad as very difficult. If you watch any of the YouTube videos where he shares his personal story, you will hear him compassionately refer to his dad as not having the ‘chip’ for being a father–because it was smashed by his own dad, long before Paul (the name he goes by) showed up. In other words, Young clearly understands that hurt people hurt people.

Before Young was five years old, he was sexually abused inside the tribal culture in which he lived. At the age of six, he was sent to a Christian boarding school, where he also experienced sexual abuse by some of the older boys at the school.

Young describes his broken relationship with his dad, the sexual abuse he experienced, and the lack of a sense of belonging (missionary kids move a lot), as the “three great sadnesses” he grew up with. This is important to keep in mind because Young uses the phrase, The Great Sadness, quite often throughout his book. The Great Sadness represents the overwhelming loss and grief experienced by a middle-class American father that no one should ever have to endure.

The story (the book is a work of fiction) takes place in the Pacific Northwest and centers around a family of seven: Mack and Nan Phillips and their five children. The two oldest are grown and gone and the three youngest, Kate, Josh, and Missy are still at home.

As a last hurrah of summer, Mack takes his three younger children camping over the Labor Day weekend. They had a wonderful time fishing, canoeing, singing around the campfire, and getting to know their neighboring campers. That is, until the last day. The day when everything changed. The day that The Great Sadness began for Mack and his family. In what seemed like a split second, six-year-old Missy was abducted from the campsite. The massive search for her ends in a dilapidated shack where there is evidence suggesting that she was brutally murdered (and probably sexually abused). Her body was not recovered, though.

The rest of the story revolves around Mack and his personal journey to healing through revisiting the shack–after receiving a mysterious invitation from Papa (the name that Nan uses to refer to Father God). Four years after the unspeakable tragedy occurs, Mack returns to the shack, where he encounters the Holy Trinity–Father, Son, and Holy Spirit–all in fleshly form. Papa is portrayed by a middle-aged, African-American woman; Jesus by a young Jewish man; and the Holy Spirit as a beautiful young Asian woman.

Young describes the shack as a metaphor for “the house we build inside ourselves out of our own pain”–often with the help of other broken people. He wrote the story out of his wife’s urging him to get down on paper his “outside-of-the-box” kind of thinking about God. He never intended for it to be published. In 2005, he had fifteen copies of the manuscript printed at Office Depot. Then he gave each one of his six kids a copy for Christmas. The rest he distributed to a handful of close friends, some of which emphatically believed it should be published.

After the manuscript was turned down by twenty-six traditional publishers, Young and two of his friends self-published The Shack through their own company, Windblown Media, in 2007. Through primarily word-of-mouth marketing, the book sold 1 million copies by June 2008, landing it on USA TODAY’s Best Selling Books list. It was the No. 1 paperback trade fiction seller on the New York Times Best Sellers’ List from June 2008 to early 2010. The Evangelical Christian Publishers Association presented The Shack with the “Diamond Award” for sales of over 10 million copies in 2009. To date, the book has sold more than 20 million copies.

No one can deny that The Shack book has touched a multitude of lives. And now that it has been made into a motion picture, its message will continue to have far-reaching effects. The Shack movie is now available for viewing on Digital HD from Amazon and iTunes. The Shack DVD and Blu-ray release date is set for May 30, 2017.

Dear reader, in today’s post, I shared some of the facts concerning the highly controversial book, The Shack, and its author, William P. Young. Next Wednesday, I will share what I believe to be the pros of reading the book and watching the movie. And the following Wednesday, I will share what I believe to be the cons. In the meantime, I would love to interact with you by asking you some questions:

  1. Have you read The Shack book and/or seen The Shack movie?
  2. If yes, what was your take away from either or both?
  3. If no, would you like to see the movie and/or read the book? If not, why not?

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

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Are You Drinking This Poison?

His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love - Excerpt 11

A refusal to forgive someone usually begins with an event where another person either purposely or unknowingly causes us pain. Whether we realize it or not, we make a choice soon after the wounding occurs. We either decide to lock the person up in an imagined debtor’s prison until he or she apologizes and/or we stop feeling hurt (a common response), or we immediately release the person from the debt owed to us by offering him or her the gift of forgiveness (an uncommon response).

If we don’t quickly forgive our offender, it will ultimately manifest in anger, bitterness, and resentment toward him or her. Drinking from this multilayered cup of flesh is like drinking poison and expecting the one who wounded us to get sick. As long as we justify our refusal to forgive the one who wounded us, we will remain in our misery.

 

 

It isn’t someone else’s sin against us that makes us miserable; it’s our own sin of refusing to forgive that person. (If you are like me, you made need to read that again.) Getting a revelation of this one truth will cause us to take full responsibility for our self–inflicted misery and resolutely choose to forgive our offender. If we live long enough, we will have many opportunities to forgive others, so we might as well make up our minds right now to be quick forgivers and enjoy our lives, regardless of what other people may or may not do.

You may be thinking, But you don’t know what this person did to me. He [or she] doesn’t deserve my forgiveness! You’re right; I don’t know, but God does, and He has forgiven you for the sins of your entire lifetime. And you didn’t deserve it either. None of us deserves His forgiveness. That’s why grace made its grand entrance into this world in the person of Jesus Christ.

 

 

Even if you don’t think any of your sins are as bad as the ones committed against you, granting forgiveness to your offender is still necessary if you would like to consistently live a Christ-glorifying life. God commands us to forgive others in the same way He has forgiven us—completely:

Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you (Eph. 4:32).

So, as those who have been chosen of God, holy and beloved, put on a heart of compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience; bearing with one another, and forgiving each other, whoever has a complaint against anyone; just as the Lord forgave you, so also should you (Col. 3:12–13).

Many people wrongly believe (as I did) that they have to feel like forgiving someone who has wronged them before they can actually do it. This lie from the pit of hell will enslave us if we believe it. Forgiveness is not a feeling; it is a determined decision of the will. We can choose to forgive because we are in union with the ultimate Forgiver, and we can do all things through Him who gives us strength (Phil. 4:13).

Before concluding the topic of forgiveness, I would be remiss if I did not address the rampant epidemic of refusing to forgive ourselves for the things we have done wrong. Plain and simple, when we refuse to forgive ourselves for something Jesus has freely and completely forgiven, we are saying that we know better than He does. In effect, we are devaluing the shed blood of Christ that secured our complete forgiveness forever.

In my own life, when I began to realize and own the totality of my forgiveness in Christ, I found it much easier to forgive myself and others. When you think about it, how can we offer anyone what we ourselves have refused to experience? Until you own Christ’s complete forgiveness, I daresay you will find it difficult to freely forgive yourself and others who have wounded you.

There is no time like the present to stop drinking the poison that is making you sick and miserable. Obey Christ by first releasing yourself from your imagined debtor’s prison. Then, release everyone else you are keeping locked up.

Dear reader, I hope you enjoyed today’s excerpt from my soon-to-be-published Bible study, His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love. I would love to interact with you concerning its content by asking you a few of questions:

  1. Are you currently choosing to drink the poison of unforgiveness toward yourself or someone else who has wounded you?
  2. If your answer to question 1 is yes, would you like to stop wasting the precious time you have left on this earth poisoning your insides? 
  3. If your answer to question 2 is yes, ask the ultimate Forgiver who lives in you to empower you  to release yourself and/or your offender from your imaginary debtor’s prison.

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

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How God Spoke to Me through “Chicken Little”

Did you know that God can speak through anything, even animated children’s cartoons? I continually ask the Lord to keep my eyes and ears peeled for all the ways He wants to reveal Himself to me. I don’t want to miss a thing (I just heard Aerosmith singing in my head).

Not too long ago, I was watching Disney Animation Collection: Vol. 2: Three Little Pigs on Netflix with my grandson, Logan. This is one string of cartoons he loves to watch again and again. If they were on a VHS tape, it would be worn out by now.

I must admit, I usually doze off after the first few minutes, but for some reason, I was more awake than usual that evening. The episode that caught my attention was the 1943 version of “Chicken Little.” An entire library of theology books on how the enemy works in our thought lives could be summed up in this nine-minute episode. You know what they say: If a picture is worth a thousand words, a movie is worth a million. At least.

This cartoon was different than the Chicken Little I read and watched as a child. The moral of that story was to not be a chicken and to have courage. It had a happy ending. But this particular Disney cartoon’s ending was anything but happy. It was downright appalling! To say that it surprised me would have been a gross understatement. Even Logan acted baffled by the ending–although there is no telling how many times he’s seen it. Kid’s cartoons just aren’t supposed to end that way.

This particular Disney cartoon’s ending was anything but happy. It was downright appalling! To say that it surprised me would have been a gross understatement.

The story opens with a contented feathered community living inside a tall white picket fence. Its inhabitants are busy doing what fowl do: the hens gossiping, pecking people to pieces; the turkeys discussing the woes of the world; the ducks and geese drinking their day away; and their fearless rooster leader overseeing and protecting his territory.

The two main characters are Chicken Little, a puny pleasure-seeking yo-yo champion described as being “a little shy on brains,” and the only player in this story who lives outside the protective barrier–Foxy Loxy. Foxy Loxy is a cunning carnivore who would love nothing more than to consume the entire lot of unsuspecting birds.

Since it is impossible for Foxy Loxy to get inside the fence, he decides to get inside the minds of his potential prey through the power of suggestion. He does this by drilling small holes in the fence and whispering lies to them in order to lure them out of their safe haven. He starts with Chicken Little and then moves on, spreading his propaganda to the rest. (If you watch the nine-minute segment below, take special notice of how he speaks to each group of birds.)

I’m not going tell you the remainder of this story. You can see for yourself how it plays out.

Earlier, I mentioned that an entire library of theology books on how the enemy works in our thought lives could be summed up in this nine-minute episode. Believer in Christ, it is vital for you to realize that not everything you hear in your mind originated with you–in your new heart. In other words, Don’t believe everything you hear! The enemy of your soul is trying to hoodwink you into accepting his lies.

In my soon-to-be-published book, His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love, I spend two full days of the study exposing the enemy’s strategies in the battle going on in our minds. If you would like to learn more, you can read my post, “Catch the Foxes.”

Dear reader, I would love to interact with you concerning today’s post content by asking you a couple of questions:

  1. Has God ever spoken to you through a movie, television show, or book on how the enemy works in the battle going on in your mind? If so, what was His message to you?
  2. What does the statement, “Don’t believe everything you hear,” mean to you?

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Disclosure of Material Connection: One or more of the links in post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

Home     My Core Beliefs     About     Resources     Speaking     Contact

 

 

The Triple-Crown Kiss from Our Savior

His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love - Excerpt 10

My husband, Steven, is an avid sports fan. He loves to watch most sports, including all three Thoroughbred horse races here in the United States—the Kentucky Derby, Preakness Stakes, and Belmont Stakes (also known as the Triple Crown). As you may well imagine, he is looking forward to watching the first race of the year, the Kentucky Derby, tomorrow.

To win all three races in the same year is considered the most prestigious accomplishment in Thoroughbred horse racing. Since its inception in 1919, there have been only twelve Triple Crown winners to date, the most recent  being American Pharoah in 2015.

American Pharoah ridden by Victor Espinoza. Photo by Mike Sekulic.

As great and rare an accomplishment as winning the Triple Crown is for a Thoroughbred, its comparison is extremely trivial to the triple-crown kiss of salvation that Jesus secured for His bride through His death and resurrection. Sadly, most of Christ’s bride focus on only one aspect of this triple-crown kiss because they are unaware of the other two. The aspect most focused on is our forgiveness. Yet most believers don’t even understand the fullness of this gift. As a result, they lack the assurance and confidence the holy bride of the King of kings should experience in their daily living through their union with Him.

Each of the three aspects of this triple-crown kiss is wonderful in and of itself, but having a personal knowledge of all three will help Christ’s bride to consistently experience and express His cherishing love and exuberant life while on this earth. In salvation, Christ’s finished work on the cross secured the following for His bride:

  • Complete forgiveness of sins through His shed blood. Hebrews 9:22 says, “Without shedding of blood there is no forgiveness.” Through Christ’s one-time offering of Himself on the cross, we have been forgiven forever for all the sins of our lifetime—past, present, and future.
  • Complete identity change through His crucified and resurrected body. Romans 6:6 tells us that “our old self was crucified with Him,” and 1 Peter 1:3 says that we were “born again … through the resurrection of Jesus Christ.” Second Corinthians 5:17 tells us that we are now brand-new creations in Christ. Through Christ’s body, our identity has been forever changed from sinner to saint (Rom. 1:7; 3:7).
  • Complete life change through His indwelling Spirit. First Corinthians 6:17 says that “the one who joins himself to the Lord is one spirit with Him,” and Colossians 3:4 tells us that “Christ … is our life.” Through our union with Christ’s Spirit, we have been given eternal life. His life is our eternal life! (1 John 5:11).

Personal knowledge of this triple-crown kiss has caused the door of my soul to fling wide open to Christ’s Bridegroom love and enjoy sweet intimacy with Him. It has given me permission to be completely loved by Him. Before Christ’s Spirit caused these objective truths to become personal realities for me, I experienced many ups and downs in my daily living. I did not have total assurance that I was completely cleansed. I felt sure that there was something in me that kept Christ from wanting to fully lavish me with His affection. Had I known of this triple-crown kiss when I believed the gospel as a nine-year-old, I daresay my life between the ages of nine and thirty-three would have played out very differently.

Dear reader, I hope you enjoyed today’s excerpt from my soon-to-be-published Bible study, His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love. I would love to interact with you concerning its content by asking you a few of questions:

  1. Prior to reading this post, were you aware of all three aspects of this triple-crown kiss of your salvation?
  2. If your answer is yes, how has knowing all three aspects of your salvation changed the way you live?
  3. If your answer is no, how do you think knowing these wonderful truths will change the way you live? 

If you prefer to interact with me through personal email rather than commenting below, you can do so by clicking here.

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

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The Importance of Seizing and Savoring Every Moment

I love to take walks around our peaceful neighborhood as soon as the weather starts cooperating. Well, I guess it’s peaceful if you don’t time your walk right before school starts or lets out (we live close to the junior high school).

One of the things I love most about spring-time walks is that new life is literally “springing” up everywhere. I’m especially thankful this year for all the colors of this season, given that our town was hit hard by a mid-January ice storm. It’s almost four months later, and Perryton residents are still cleaning up downed branches and assessing the damage done to their trees, homes, and other structures.

The saying “You don’t know what you got till it’s gone” could have been the front-page headline of The Perryton Herald the week following the devastation. I have lived in the Texas Panhandle pretty much my whole life and have never seen anything like it.

The saying “You don’t know what you got till it’s gone” could have been the front-page headline of The Perryton Herald the week following the devastation.

Then, on March 6, high winds and dry conditions set the stage for an onslaught of Panhandle wildfires that consumed almost a half million acres, took precious lives, and destroyed ranch homes and animals. So sad. It makes me want to cry just thinking about it.

Up until this year, I have said on more than one occasion, “It seems like Perryton is tucked inside a protected bubble.” It doesn’t seem much that way anymore. We live in a world that is constantly changing. That’s why I believe it is so important for all of us to seize and savor every moment God has given us on this earth.

One evening a couple of weeks ago, I was out walking and listening to my new favorite album by MercyMe, Lifer, when a beautiful bed of tulips caught my eye. It was so stunning, I decided to stop and take a picture of it with my phone.

While the quality of the picture isn’t that great (where’s Angela Manross when you need a gorgeous photo taken?), I think you might agree with me that it was a “Kodak moment.” Flowers don’t wear their glory very long, so we need to savor them while we can. I walked by the same tulip bed this afternoon and all the petals are gone.

It’s the same with life. The longer I live, the more I realize that the average life span of about eighty years is like the petals of a flower quickly falling away. First Peter 1:23-25 says,

See that you do love each other, fervently and from the heart. For you are the sons of God now; the live, permanent Word of the living God has given you his own indestructible heredity. It is true that: ‘All flesh is as grass, and all the glory of man as the flower of the grass. The grass withers, and its flower falls away, but the word of the Lord endures for ever.’ (PHILLIPS)

While believers in Christ will live together forever with Him in eternity, our time on earth is precious. It is our only opportunity to share the love and life of Christ with a lost and dying world.

While believers in Christ will live together forever with Him in eternity, our time on earth is precious. It is our only opportunity to share the love and life of Christ with a lost and dying world.

After going through a cancer scare last year, I don’t want to waste any time. I want to seize and savor every beautiful moment that God gives me until I breathe my last. I want to cooperate with Him so that the dreams I believe He has written on my heart will materialize in my lifetime.

The dream of publishing my first book, His Banner Over Me Is Pursuing Love, is about to come true, and I am incredibly humbled and thankful for that. I believe God’s dream for my life on this earth is to publish at least two more studies and maybe a daily devotional to accompany each of those three studies. And I’m open to anything else He may want to add to that!

In short, I want to seize every moment that He has gifted me with on this earth to share His life and love with anyone willing to listen.

Dear reader, I pray that today’s post pulled on the dream-strings of your heart, causing you to realize that time is short, whether for the baby in the cradle or for the man or woman in his or her senior years. I would love to hear what dreams God has placed on your heart and the direction He has given you for seeing those dreams materialize on this earth. 

Until next time,

 

 

 

P.S.  If you enjoyed this post and want to know more about me and the types of content I will be posting, please visit my About Page.

MY CONTACT INFORMATION:

Kim K. Francis
P.O. Box 357
Perryton, TX 79070
806.435.5575

EMAIL
MY BLOG: KimKFrancis.com
TWITTER: @KimKFrancis 64
FACEBOOK: Kim K Francis

Home     My Core Beliefs     About     Resources     Speaking     Contact